Lipscomb will seek Disrtrict 32 Senate seat

By Bob Morgan
Posted 5/15/07

Former state senator and Baldwin County commissioner Albert Lipscomb said Tuesday he will seek the District 32 Senate seat being vacated by state Sen. Bradley Byrne, R-Montrose, who will become the next chancellor of the state's two-year college …

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Lipscomb will seek Disrtrict 32 Senate seat

Posted

Former state senator and Baldwin County commissioner Albert Lipscomb said Tuesday he will seek the District 32 Senate seat being vacated by state Sen. Bradley Byrne, R-Montrose, who will become the next chancellor of the state's two-year college system.

Lipscomb served in the Alabama Senate for 13 years after winning a 1989 special election. He served until 2002 after winning elections in 1990, 1994 and 1998. After running unsuccessfully for the U.S. congressional seat vacated by Sonny Callahan, Lipscomb was eventually appointed to the Baldwin County Commission by the governor following the death of Mary Frances Stewart. He eventually served as chairman of the commission.

Lipscomb recently ran an unsuccessful state campaign for Commissioner of Agriculture and Industry.

"This all sort of came together in short order," Lipscomb said, noting he has talked with family and friends about running for state Senate again. At present, Lipscomb said he knows of nine people who have indicated they might seek the Senate seat about to be vacated by Byrne. One thing that will be different this time around is that Senate District 32 is in Baldwin County, Lipscomb said.

The Senate district Lipscomb represented from 1989 to 2002 included a section of north Mobile County. Lipscomb said he has worked closely with the Baldwin County School Board during his years of public service as well as volunteer fire departments in the county.

He expects the machinery to be in place for the special election during the next "hundred days" and, with so many potential candidates, a run-off will probably be in order, he said.