Daphne High grad, aspiring astronaut, wins Zero-G flight

By Allison Marlow
Managing Editor
allisonm@gulfcoastmedia.com
Posted 9/23/22

When you don't catch floating balls of water in space, you tend to get pretty wet.That was one of the fun lessons Jordan Carraway learned when she floated in zero gravity last week aboard G-Force …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Daphne High grad, aspiring astronaut, wins Zero-G flight

Posted

When you don't catch floating balls of water in space, you tend to get pretty wet.

That was one of the fun lessons Jordan Carraway learned when she floated in zero gravity last week aboard G-Force One, a modified Boeing 727 that gives people the chance to float like astronauts in a zero-gravity environment.

The 2019 Daphne High graduate won the ride from Peter Diamandis, co-founder of Zero-G, for signing up the most subscribers to his weekly e-newsletter, MINDset Mondays.

Carraway, an aspiring astronaut, ROTC cadet and reigning Miss Hoover said the trip was everything she dreamed it would be.

"It was amazing. The sensation of weightlessness is very weird. It feels like you are falling in every single direction," Carraway said. "Your brain and your eyes understand theoretically that there is an up, down, left, right but the body feels a different sensation. The disconnect between the two is very weird."

The plane made 15 parabolas, or flight patterns that achieve weightlessness for passengers. Three of those simulated lunar gravity, 1/6 of Earth's gravity, each lasted about 30 seconds.

While the plane climbed, passengers laid on their backs. When the plane dove back towards the Earth, the passengers inside became weightless. Carraway said she could feel gravity return "in an instant" once the flight pattern ended, though it wasn't a harsh drop.

"At one point there were five or six of us against the back wall of the plane and gravity started coming back and we were dog piled on top of each other. It was very funny," she said.

Coaches aboard the plane threw items like jellybeans through the air, helped the passengers spin and showed them how to create spherical water droplets when they poured water bottles midflight.

"They grabbed my legs and pulled me, and it took no effort. I was curled up in a tight ball and they were pushing me around the aircraft like I was a balloon. It was so much fun," Carraway said.

Carraway said the experience has bolstered her desire to become an astronaut.

Currently she is a senior at Auburn University and will serve in the military upon graduation. This summer she worked as a counselor at Space Camp in Huntsville.

"I feel like an addict," Carraway said of the weightless flight. "I'm craving to go again."

Stay in the know on the Alabama Gulf Coast. Sign up for our free email newsletter.

* indicates required